• The concave gap between the teeth of a file or saw.
  • The height of a saw tooth as measured from the base to the point.
  • The space between tabs on a standard asphalt strip shingle.


  • noun the tube down which food and drink passes from the mouth to the stomach

Origin & History of “gullet”

Latin gula meant ‘throat’. It was a descendant of Indo-European *gel- ‘swallow’, which also produced German kehle ‘throat’ and English glut and glutton. Gula passed into Old French as gole or goule (whence modern French gueule ‘mouth’), where it formed the basis of a diminutive form goulet, acquired by English as gullet (and later, in the 16th century, as gully, which originally meant ‘gullet’). The English heraldic term gules ‘red’ (14th c.) also comes from Old French gole, goule, in the specialized sense ‘red fur neckpiece’.